2006-11-18

In a dilemma?

Next few posts will also be around consulting. Status quo is easy; change isn't.

This is the time of the year when many at ISB will still be in a dilemma about which industries / jobs. Some, having had good experience in industry, would get good industry jobs. But having come to ISB for exploring new options and having seen Consulting hype around, tend to think a lot about consulting as a career option. While many people think that they have made a decision not to pursue consulting, come PPT time, their inner urges to explore new options would come back. A good % of these people will end up applying to consulting or such other jobs which they had earlier not considered or only not sure about.

I am a great believer in the power of context. Context influences many of our decisions. It is important, though difficult, to separate decision making from the context called ISB. Take a break during the term-breaks, go out of ISB, go back to people in the industry you have come from, talk to them about options in the industry. Parallely, reach out to as many alumni working in Consulting or the new options that you are targetting as possible. Take their honest views on how they feel about consulting or that job. Also, talk to alumni with a similar background like yours (years of experience, same industry, same education background, et al)

If some were to ask me how to make a decision, here are my two cents.

1. There are a few factors to look for before making a decision about a job -

Supply side - Recruiter's brand; quality of work; internal grade; money.

Demand side - Your fitment with the job (are you a team person or a lone ranger, are you a quant person or a creative kind, etc); your personal preferences

2. Of the above supply side factors, you can compromise on one. Since ISB (as any other b-school is ) is a closed market, choice making is slightly skewed. So one could compromise on a max of 2 factors.

3. Look back into your work life. What was important to you. If you are a person usually driven by money, do not presume that you are now changed and are okay with good brand, quality of work, etc but okay with getting paid low. Once you getting into the job, nitty-gritty will start to take importance. You will remember of money more than you ever. Please be honest to yourself.

4. Be careful about decisions which may be irreversible. Always have PLAN B. Always keep good contact with industry and people you have known through work.

5. Over-dependence on one industry or over-confidence that you will make it to, say, consulting, is dangerous. In an environment as competitive as ISB, one can never be sure.

6. If you are unsure about consulting, but tend to like it, then think about client work, the impact you can creat at a client's place, working with some of the smartest people, good money down the line..... You will have made a decision to puruse consulting.

7. If you are unsure about consulting, but tend to not like it, then think about times you were left stranded at airports because of flight delays, getting up at 4.30 am on Monday to catch 6.30 flight, living away from your dear ones. You will have probably made a decision.

8. Never EVER compromise on demand side factors. I.E., do not choose an industry that requires factors that you just don't have.


And finally, please make a good resume and a cover letter. Till you send your resume to recruiters in January, reviewing resume should be in your daily schedule.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Excellent Explanation and great insights, Vijay!

Ford Prefect said...

Dude ... How about we get together and make some money in career counselling ... I think people would give you a lot of money to review their essays and resumes ... And we could have mock interviews and GD's and stuff ... Think about it man ... Best of all we can do it over the weekends and still keep our jobs ...

bhaskar said...

Vijay,
thanks for posting some nice tips on resume.
it really helps for first year students not only of ISB but also others like me from MBS.


bye
Bhaskar

2006-11-18

In a dilemma?

Next few posts will also be around consulting. Status quo is easy; change isn't.

This is the time of the year when many at ISB will still be in a dilemma about which industries / jobs. Some, having had good experience in industry, would get good industry jobs. But having come to ISB for exploring new options and having seen Consulting hype around, tend to think a lot about consulting as a career option. While many people think that they have made a decision not to pursue consulting, come PPT time, their inner urges to explore new options would come back. A good % of these people will end up applying to consulting or such other jobs which they had earlier not considered or only not sure about.

I am a great believer in the power of context. Context influences many of our decisions. It is important, though difficult, to separate decision making from the context called ISB. Take a break during the term-breaks, go out of ISB, go back to people in the industry you have come from, talk to them about options in the industry. Parallely, reach out to as many alumni working in Consulting or the new options that you are targetting as possible. Take their honest views on how they feel about consulting or that job. Also, talk to alumni with a similar background like yours (years of experience, same industry, same education background, et al)

If some were to ask me how to make a decision, here are my two cents.

1. There are a few factors to look for before making a decision about a job -

Supply side - Recruiter's brand; quality of work; internal grade; money.

Demand side - Your fitment with the job (are you a team person or a lone ranger, are you a quant person or a creative kind, etc); your personal preferences

2. Of the above supply side factors, you can compromise on one. Since ISB (as any other b-school is ) is a closed market, choice making is slightly skewed. So one could compromise on a max of 2 factors.

3. Look back into your work life. What was important to you. If you are a person usually driven by money, do not presume that you are now changed and are okay with good brand, quality of work, etc but okay with getting paid low. Once you getting into the job, nitty-gritty will start to take importance. You will remember of money more than you ever. Please be honest to yourself.

4. Be careful about decisions which may be irreversible. Always have PLAN B. Always keep good contact with industry and people you have known through work.

5. Over-dependence on one industry or over-confidence that you will make it to, say, consulting, is dangerous. In an environment as competitive as ISB, one can never be sure.

6. If you are unsure about consulting, but tend to like it, then think about client work, the impact you can creat at a client's place, working with some of the smartest people, good money down the line..... You will have made a decision to puruse consulting.

7. If you are unsure about consulting, but tend to not like it, then think about times you were left stranded at airports because of flight delays, getting up at 4.30 am on Monday to catch 6.30 flight, living away from your dear ones. You will have probably made a decision.

8. Never EVER compromise on demand side factors. I.E., do not choose an industry that requires factors that you just don't have.


And finally, please make a good resume and a cover letter. Till you send your resume to recruiters in January, reviewing resume should be in your daily schedule.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Excellent Explanation and great insights, Vijay!

Ford Prefect said...

Dude ... How about we get together and make some money in career counselling ... I think people would give you a lot of money to review their essays and resumes ... And we could have mock interviews and GD's and stuff ... Think about it man ... Best of all we can do it over the weekends and still keep our jobs ...

bhaskar said...

Vijay,
thanks for posting some nice tips on resume.
it really helps for first year students not only of ISB but also others like me from MBS.


bye
Bhaskar