2007-01-30

Abuse of the word strategy and its variants

Peer pressure is a dangerous reality in our lives. Everyone would have succumbed to it, at one or the other point. Some would have started smoking because friends thought him / her to be un-cool otherwise; some would have excelled in academics or something else because people around challenged him / her to do so. How about doctoring resumes to live up to the competition around?

The word 'strategy' is present in many, if not most, of the CVs that I have been reviewing for sometime now. Anyone who has done strategy would have no reason to come to a b-shool. He or she is already in a good position, because, to me, strategy is the function of a C-level executive. Anyone else claiming to have strategized or done strategy is just making it up. But does using the word strategy or its variants on resume help the candidate. Unfortunately, No. The recruiters, who -one should appreciate- are smarter than the candidates themselves, can easily read into this. What it says about the candidate is that, the candidate is not honest about the work he has done. Lack of honesty is a serious reason to reject or not consider a candidate.

While people feel peer-pressured into writing such words on the resume there is actually no need for it if one works slightly harder. The alternative approach to using the word ' strategy' is lot more gratifying and can perhaps really work the magic of shortlist or even selection. Taking a pen and a paper to put down all the minutia of the work one has done. Drawing a message out of the work done, putting a structure to it and presenting it in good language is all that is required.

It does not matter where one has worked, what one has done. In every job there is an opportunity to improve the way things are done / happening - it could be improving efficiency, could be increasing revenues, could be brining back the business to its normalcy.

2 comments:

Chirantan Mandal said...

Hi Vijay,
This was a very insightful post! With placement season just around the corner, there are many such fanciful and at times decietful 'Garnishings' of CV!

Your views on this made a difference, at least to ones like me who were undecided of how honest to remain in such an environment!

Thanks!

bhaskar said...

I completely agree with you.I am totally puzzled by the fact that HR guys still are fascinated with these kind of CVs.

2007-01-30

Abuse of the word strategy and its variants

Peer pressure is a dangerous reality in our lives. Everyone would have succumbed to it, at one or the other point. Some would have started smoking because friends thought him / her to be un-cool otherwise; some would have excelled in academics or something else because people around challenged him / her to do so. How about doctoring resumes to live up to the competition around?

The word 'strategy' is present in many, if not most, of the CVs that I have been reviewing for sometime now. Anyone who has done strategy would have no reason to come to a b-shool. He or she is already in a good position, because, to me, strategy is the function of a C-level executive. Anyone else claiming to have strategized or done strategy is just making it up. But does using the word strategy or its variants on resume help the candidate. Unfortunately, No. The recruiters, who -one should appreciate- are smarter than the candidates themselves, can easily read into this. What it says about the candidate is that, the candidate is not honest about the work he has done. Lack of honesty is a serious reason to reject or not consider a candidate.

While people feel peer-pressured into writing such words on the resume there is actually no need for it if one works slightly harder. The alternative approach to using the word ' strategy' is lot more gratifying and can perhaps really work the magic of shortlist or even selection. Taking a pen and a paper to put down all the minutia of the work one has done. Drawing a message out of the work done, putting a structure to it and presenting it in good language is all that is required.

It does not matter where one has worked, what one has done. In every job there is an opportunity to improve the way things are done / happening - it could be improving efficiency, could be increasing revenues, could be brining back the business to its normalcy.

2 comments:

Chirantan Mandal said...

Hi Vijay,
This was a very insightful post! With placement season just around the corner, there are many such fanciful and at times decietful 'Garnishings' of CV!

Your views on this made a difference, at least to ones like me who were undecided of how honest to remain in such an environment!

Thanks!

bhaskar said...

I completely agree with you.I am totally puzzled by the fact that HR guys still are fascinated with these kind of CVs.