2007-03-24

What ails Indian cricket

It is all about incentives. Lack of, that is. Neither for the parents, nor for the probable aspirant.

It perhaps takes 1000 people to fail to make one international cricketer. Is it fair, as just armchair fans (not necessarily of cricket but only of cricket played at international level), that we should expect more tendulkars -no, not tendulkar, he has not won matches for India - more yuvraj singhs to come up, and that Indian team keeps winning, while we keep pursuing corporate careers and make millions. In a country where much of the money available in sport is concentrated in a few cricketers and hardly any money to make in domestic cricket, there is , obviously, no economic incentive to chase the dream of being a cricketer. When there is insignificant probability of success, nor good money to make in domestic cricket, why would any parent encourage children to pursue cricket; even why would an individual look at cricket as a career to make decent money (guess, State Banks and other nationalized banks have more or less stopped making job offers to Ranji players). The only reason (psychological incentive) why anyone would, perhaps, get into cricket is that he (now, she too) loves the game. This tribe would also dwindle as one cannot march on empty stomachs and, on the other hand, opportunities in corporate world increase.

Add to this, the politics in selections, betting, et al. Honestly, I do not see a great future for the sport in India.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

But I see.... The desire to excel (in tactic and athletically) will always inspire decent amount of folks to take sports!

2007-03-24

What ails Indian cricket

It is all about incentives. Lack of, that is. Neither for the parents, nor for the probable aspirant.

It perhaps takes 1000 people to fail to make one international cricketer. Is it fair, as just armchair fans (not necessarily of cricket but only of cricket played at international level), that we should expect more tendulkars -no, not tendulkar, he has not won matches for India - more yuvraj singhs to come up, and that Indian team keeps winning, while we keep pursuing corporate careers and make millions. In a country where much of the money available in sport is concentrated in a few cricketers and hardly any money to make in domestic cricket, there is , obviously, no economic incentive to chase the dream of being a cricketer. When there is insignificant probability of success, nor good money to make in domestic cricket, why would any parent encourage children to pursue cricket; even why would an individual look at cricket as a career to make decent money (guess, State Banks and other nationalized banks have more or less stopped making job offers to Ranji players). The only reason (psychological incentive) why anyone would, perhaps, get into cricket is that he (now, she too) loves the game. This tribe would also dwindle as one cannot march on empty stomachs and, on the other hand, opportunities in corporate world increase.

Add to this, the politics in selections, betting, et al. Honestly, I do not see a great future for the sport in India.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

But I see.... The desire to excel (in tactic and athletically) will always inspire decent amount of folks to take sports!