2008-12-04

Intelligence reports cannot be actioned

Was talking to a person who worked in the Home department of a state governement. When he began his stint in the Home Department, the department used to action on every intelligence report. Say, an intelligence report stating that a mall in a city could be attacked will be actioned by sending police to all malls in that city, beefing up checks, etc. After 2 months, the department realized that all intelligent reports were vague and almost all times proved to be wrong. In the process of responding to intelligence reports, the State was tiring itself both financially and mentally.

As Swaminathan points out in his column, Al Qaeda wants to weaken US financially before it starts doing serious work. The primary modus operandi is by putting intelligence and state forces on a wrong path.

Most of the intelligence reports get into a file after some 10 government officials sign on it. Not necessarily because they do not care, but because they cannot act on these.

PS:

1. Hopefully, this is one of such attempts by terrorists to fool rather than to act.

2. That our government is quite incapable, I do not have slightest doubts.

3. Not that we cannot take preventive action - say, national ID cards is something that can help. I am sure our IT companies can provide a robust software to start this; we have enough manpower to get this done in 6 months.

4. I somehow tend not to believe these "near-miss" stories.

5. Is one a hero only if he dies? What about the rest who fought but survived (not sure if it was because of just luck or if they were smarter)

No comments:

2008-12-04

Intelligence reports cannot be actioned

Was talking to a person who worked in the Home department of a state governement. When he began his stint in the Home Department, the department used to action on every intelligence report. Say, an intelligence report stating that a mall in a city could be attacked will be actioned by sending police to all malls in that city, beefing up checks, etc. After 2 months, the department realized that all intelligent reports were vague and almost all times proved to be wrong. In the process of responding to intelligence reports, the State was tiring itself both financially and mentally.

As Swaminathan points out in his column, Al Qaeda wants to weaken US financially before it starts doing serious work. The primary modus operandi is by putting intelligence and state forces on a wrong path.

Most of the intelligence reports get into a file after some 10 government officials sign on it. Not necessarily because they do not care, but because they cannot act on these.

PS:

1. Hopefully, this is one of such attempts by terrorists to fool rather than to act.

2. That our government is quite incapable, I do not have slightest doubts.

3. Not that we cannot take preventive action - say, national ID cards is something that can help. I am sure our IT companies can provide a robust software to start this; we have enough manpower to get this done in 6 months.

4. I somehow tend not to believe these "near-miss" stories.

5. Is one a hero only if he dies? What about the rest who fought but survived (not sure if it was because of just luck or if they were smarter)

No comments: